Sunday, July 20, 2014

Is Your Student Ready for High School? Check out our limited time Back to School special!!



The move to high school is a big one and most students (and parents) may be feeling a little anxious about the change. One way to help alleviate your child’s nervousness and prepare them for their new life as a high school student is to be prepared. Knowing what to expect will help to bolster their confidence and makes for a smooth and easy transition to their new environment.
Doing Research
Start by browsing the school website with your student. You can look at the news sections to read more about events at the school, you can also learn more about the teachers, counselors and other staff members. Read the school newspaper or magazine and the yearbook to help orient yourselves. This will give you and your student an idea of what to expect and how you can get involved.
Orientation
Attend the high school orientation to learn about school rules and to see what facilities the school has. If possible, take this opportunity to meet your child’s teachers and introduce them to your child. Let your child explore the school so that they won’t get lost on their first day.  One good practice is to find all of the classrooms your child will be attending and navigating to them from different parts of the school so that they always feel like they know where they are going.
After school activities
Encourage your student to investigate clubs and sports that they can get involved in. This is a great way to meet new friends and to make your child feel like they are part of the school community. If they are trying something new, they have the summer to practice which will boost their confidence too.
Routines
One of the biggest changes when moving to high school is the amount of work your child has to do in a week. You can help them transition by teaching effective organizational, time-management and task prioritization skills also known as executive  skills. If yo student needs help with executive skills, contact Tutor Doctor Longmont today for a free consultation.  You can also encourage them to do some of the requisite reading, or provide in-home tutoring over the summer months.
If your child struggles academically, you can really give them a jump start by filling in the missing building blocks in their academic knowledge. Just one or two sessions a week is all they need to catch up and even move ahead so that they can start the new academic year without adding academic woes to their list of challenges.
Start getting your child up at the right time for school a couple of weeks prior to the start of the school year so that they get accustomed to a morning routine. If they have to get themselves to school, you may need a practice run or two to ensure that they have the route and timing under control.
Ensure that your child has ‘emergency’ fare for a taxi or bus should they lose their transport pass or miss the school bus. Discuss emergency plans for worst case scenarios, put all relevant numbers onto their phones and make sure they have your number memorized in case their phone isn’t working. 

Tutor Doctor Longmont has a limited time back to school special. Contact  us today to see how you can  get up to 20 free hours of tutoring (restrictions apply). Time is limited so call today!

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

How Well Do You Understand the Common Core State Standard Initiative?




The Common Core initiative was implemented in the U.S. for K-12 students and outlines what they should know and understand after completing each grade. The initiative focuses on English language and math skills and aims to create consistent standards across the country and ensure that students who graduate high school are adequately prepared to take college courses.
The Common Core only outlines what skills and knowledge students should have; it is up to each state to develop curricula that would help students. Experts agree that the standards require a higher level of understanding than the systems that were in place in many states. As a result, some states will have to improve their standards to be aligned with the common core. While the Common Core has been widely accepted, some states have re instituted their own education standards rather than those proposed by the federal government.
Jay Stype, Tutor Doctor Longmont owner, had this to say about the difficulties some states are having with the implementation of the Common Core Standard: “Misinformation or misunderstanding of the nature and objectives of Common Core have sometimes resulted in parents’ fear, cynicism, and skepticism. Homework can initially appear foreign from the parents’ prior experience, and some conclude they’re unable to assist their children with homework. A closer look and steady patience can help parents perceive the critical thinking aspect of the lesson, and eventually fears and unfamiliarity can subside. At the same time, the implementation of Common Core has increased the opportunity for tutors and supplemental education providers to assist students and families in succeeding with their studies,” he said.
Many elements of the Common Core have contributed to the improvement of the way in which students are educated. One of these is taking into consideration the learning styles of students so that the teacher is able to present information in a way that appeals to every learning style and is more inclusive.
If your school or state is in the process of implementing Common Core, the best thing to do is to educate yourself. Schools and states have websites and information to help families with the transition. Be sure to ask your teacher where you can go to learn more about the new curriculum and what Common Core will mean for your children.
If your children are struggling with the transition, consider a private one-on-one tutor. Here the tutor will work with your family, the teacher and your child to find the missing skills and building blocks in their foundation. Teaching the skills will help your child to be an independent learner for life.

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Can Wearing Headphones Damage my Child’s Hearing?.



Ah! The unparalleled tranquility that means you don’t have to listen to One Direction anymore. Headphones do bring some welcome peace and quiet to your household and most teens enjoy listening to music on their smartphones, but when music is played too loudly through headphones, it can result in permanent hearing loss.
According to a study by the Journal of American Medical Association, hearing loss in teens is “30% higher than it was in the ’80s and ’90s”. The study estimates that about 1 in 5 (that’s 6.5 million) US teens suffer some hearing loss from listening to loud music on their headphones.
While you may feel like your hearing is being damaged when your children turn up the volume, you are far safer than when music is played loudly through a headset. The proximity of the transducers to the eardrums is what poses the danger here. Hearing is made possible by tiny hair cells in the cochlea that convert vibrations into electrical signals that travel to the brain. These tiny hairs naturally die out as we age, but can be permanently damaged by too much vibration.
Loud music (or other noise) can result in two kinds of damage. Sensorineural damage occurs in the inner ear when hair cells are negatively affected by loud noises. Each group of hair cells is used to hear a particular frequency of sound. When they die off, that frequency can no longer be heard. High frequency hair cells are the most sensitive and they are the first to succumb to damage. This means that most adults can’t hear frequencies between 3 kHz and 6 kHz.
You can test which frequencies you can no longer hear by following this link. http://digg.com/video/how-good-is-your-hearing.
Tinnitus is a more serious condition in which the hair cells suffer permanent damage. Here the hair cells register vibrations even if there is no sound which results in a persistent buzzing sound.  
How loud should headphones be?
Here are the recommended daily doses of sound that the ear can safely manage.  
90 dbA  8 hrs
92 dbA  6 hrs
95 dbA  4 hrs
97 dbA  3 hrs
100 dbA 2 hrs
102 dbA 1.5 hrs
105 dbA 1 hr
110 dbA 0.5 hr
115 dbA 0.25 hr or less
Encourage your children to practice caution when they are playing music loudly. While it may be okay for very short periods of time, it could result in damage or permanent hearing loss. Listening to loud music while walking, biking or driving can compromise your ability to pick up dangers in your surrounding environment.  As a general rule, advise your kids to always keep volumes below 70%.

picture: 

 Maddercarmine